Why older people talk about their ailments

A great article helping us to concentrate on life not our sickness

Write into life

6-girls-togs.jpg The six Taylor sisters being schooled at home during a polio epidemic

Aunt Beulah posed (indirectly) a fascinating question in her latest blog post:

Why, as we grow older, do we feel the urge to discuss our health problems at length, when as children we never did?

So many hypotheses rushed into my head that I was forced to share them immediately. Oh dear. So that means I’m a case in point…

These hypotheses are warped by my early life as a cheerful healthy kid with five healthy sisters in the 1940s. My thoughts are bound to be misguided or outright wrong. Tell me, I can take it!

  1. (Worst first.) Our world has shrunk. We are less interested in the outside world and  more interested in ourselves. So we assume the big world is equally interested in our ailments. Ouch. Please let that not be true!
  2. We were strong healthy children. So most health problems were due to “childhood…

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Sing, Dance and be Healthy —

Thank you to the Sydney Morning Herald for sharing such a heart warming story about Perth seniors. Willagee Community Centre came to life last month as patrons arrived to take part in a seniors entertainment day. Singing and dancing was all part of the day along with maintaining health, well being and the opportunity to […]

via Sing, Dance and be Healthy —

ALEXA – Have you met her?

If you haven’t met Alexa don’t feel bad. Until a few days ago I didn’t know her either. I met her while visiting my friend Helen. We were enjoying a glass of fine when Helen suddenly called out,

“Alexa when do we have to leave for the movies?”

Confused I looked around to see who she was talking to, because I was under the impression we were alone, “Who are you talking to?”

“Oh, that’s  Alexa, our Echo Speaker.” Helen answered.

“Echo Speaker?” What is that?”

Helen told me all about it and while she demonstrated it I felt I had been transferred to another planet. But no, I was right here on earth, and  listening and looking in awe at the black cylinder on the table, I found out that by using nothing but your voice Alexa can help with tasks like:echo-fullres-1784-1-630-jpg-alexa

  • shop on-line
  • create a to-do or shopping lists
  • search the web
  • dim or turn on the light
  • get the weather report and so on and so on……..

These are just a few things Alexa can do. There is so much more; too much to tell you about here – besides I doubt that my explanation could do justice to this little miracle. But if you go on Amazon (yes, where else do we buy anything today?) you can find out all about it, and it might just tempt you to have Alexa as a friend too!

What about me? Did she become my friend? No! Yet, I do admit it’s a really cool idea and she could help me do many things, but this is where I have a problem. Being  at an age when it is important to keep active and move, a device that will stop me from doing things myself is not what I need. So I will wait a few years!

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By the way Alexa was named after the ancient library in Alexandria, Egypt –  a tall order to follow indeed., but she seems to manage well.libraryofalexandria

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And never forger – A Smile Changes Everything!

brigitte-headshot

STORY BEHIND THE NEW COVER

Yesterday I announced the revised cover for Getting Over Growing OlderPlease join me over at Change It Up Editing with Candace Johnson to learn the story behind it. And don’t forget to let me know in the comments what you think of the new cover!

Don’t Judge a Book by Its Cover: Guest Post by Brigitte Nioche

by cyjohnson5580@gmail.com

getting-over-growing-olderThe self-publishing authors I work with understand that a professional team of editors and designers are needed to create a quality book that can stand out in a competitive marketplace.

But what happens when the cover you choose hurts instead of helps your book? Do you stick with the cover you and your designer worked so hard to create, or do you go back to the drawing board?

Brigitte Nioche, author of Getting Over Growing Older: A Humorous Memoir of Discovering the Challenges of Aging, faced that dilemma several weeks after her book was published. In celebration of the re-release of her book, she’s agreed to share her story with you:

I believe we all judge a book by its cover! Viewing a book’s cover is like getting a first impression when meeting a new person—that first impression tells us if we want to see more or not.

It is the same when we browse in a bookstore, or even when we scan the pages of Amazon. A cover or title either catches our interest, or we pass over that book.

Several weeks after its debut, I decided to change the cover of my recently getting-over-originalpublished book, Getting Over Growing Older. If you saw it on Facebook, Twitter, or on my blog, you will remember that it prominently featured a picture of me.

The Reaction Wasn’t What I Expected

And the reaction I always got was “Oh, that’s a nice photo of you,” but that was not the message I wanted to convey. By putting my picture on the cover I wanted to show readers Read more of this post

cyjohnson5580@gmail.com | September 15, 2016 at 10:06 am | URL: http://wp.me/p7jJkx-T5
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